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Kobe Bryant and the Lakers to Use "The Princeton Offense"

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Kobe Bryant hopes the Princeton offense will produce a lot of dunkshots.  Mandatory Credit: Mark D. Smith-US PRESSWIRE
Kobe Bryant hopes the Princeton offense will produce a lot of dunkshots. Mandatory Credit: Mark D. Smith-US PRESSWIRE

In case you missed it from yesterday, it appears that the Los Angeles Lakers will be using the Princeton offense next season. According to this report from Yahoo, Kobe sat down with Lakers coach Mike Brown during this offseason and the two discussed ways to create "spacing and freedom and flow" for the team on offense.

"It's a great offense," Bryant told Yahoo! Sports. "It's exactly what we need. It takes us back to being able to play by making reads and reacting to defenses. It takes a great deal of communication, but that's where we're at our best: Reading and reacting as opposed to just coming down and calling sets. Calling sets make you vulnerable."

More after The Jump:

"There's so many threats, so many options, it's very tough to defend. Against the type of defenses that teams play nowadays, they load up on one side and are constantly coming with help from the weak side. The Princeton offense makes it very, very tough to lock in on one particular player.

"From my experience, those types of principles - ball movement, changing sides on the floor, everybody being involved - those are championship principles. That's championship DNA."

Though the Princeton has achieved success in the college ranks, it has yet to be fully embraced and produce a champion at the pro level. Former Washington Wizards coach Eddie Jordan, considered one of the best Princeton offense minds in the NBA, has been consulted by the Lakers and will likely join the staff in the near future to help implement it.

For Georgetown, this development is crucial. Should Kobe Bryant, Steve Nash, Pau Gasol, Andrew Bynum and the rest of the Lakers achieve success with this offense, it could result as an awakening to future recruits who, perhaps unfairly, view the offense as perhaps limiting their individual capabilities and statistics.